Equal Access to information and services

Equal access to information and online services enables the full and independent participation by people with a disability in our digital economy. It not only makes good business and marketing sense, but is also consistent with our society’s obligations to remove discrimination and promote human rights. So how well are we going?

To answer that question we need to look at three elements. The legislation and international treaties, Government policy responses to support that legislation and finally practices we have in place that support the policy and legislation.

Element 1: Legislation

The Australian Human Rights Commission highlights that equal access to information and online services is a:

Element 2: Policy responses

  • 2000: Requirement for Australian Government departments and agencies to provide accessible information and online services as part of e-Government Strategy.
  • 2009: Australian Government, State and Territory Governments and the New Zealand Government agreed on a National Transition Strategy (NTS) on Web Accessibility. The NTS roadmap stipulated that all government websites (federal, state and territory) had to meet a minimum of Web CoWCAG 2.0 Level A compliance by the end of 2012. Furthermore, Federal Government websites had to meet a minimum of WCAG 2.0 Level AA compliance by the end of 2014 in most states by December 2015
  • 2010: National Disability Strategy 2010-2020.  Aa ten year plan (2010-2020) for enabling people with a disability to fulfil their potential as equal citizens.
  • 2010: Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities
    1.6 Strategies to support full participation of students with disability
  • 2012: NSW Premiers directive under C2012-08 NSW Government Website Management
  • 2014: NSW Disability Inclusion Act 2014 No 41
  • 2016Marrakesh Treaty for people with print disability
  • 2016: Australia implements Australian Standard EN 301 549 on accessibility requirements suitable for public procurement of ICT products and services.
  • 2017: NSW updates ICT services scheme (SCM0020) rules  to include the Australian Standard EN 301 549. (Full implementation July 2018)

Element 3: Practices

Policy into practice, coming soon. Topics covered to include.

  1. Mapping organisational information systems and online services
  2. Building awareness of the need for digital inclusion (internal and external)
  3. Embedding inclusive culture in ICT procurement and creation and publishing and capturing of digital content.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Alternative text basics

What is alternative text?

It is a short text alternative that explains the content and / or function of non-text content (photos, buttons, graphs)  in most digital documents such as Adobe Acrobat, Apple Pages and iBooks Author, Google Docs, Microsoft Office and OneNote and of course web pages such as this.

Alternative text can be presented in two ways:

  • Within the alternative text field related to the image.
    (Sometimes this field might be called alt text or accessibility description)
  • Within the text information surrounding the image itself.

What function does alternative text serve?

  • It is read by screen readers (such as Apple’s VoiceOver) in place of images. This allows the content and function of the image to be accessible to anyone with a print disability.
  • It is displayed in place of the image in web browsers if the image file is not loaded or when the user has chosen not to view images.
  • It provides a semantic meaning and description to images which can be read by search engines.

Things to consider before writing alternative text.

What you write as the alternative text really depends upon the context. You need to think about the audience, the purpose of the image and the message you want to convey. Describe the most important aspect(s) of the image first and omit decorative details unless they are crucial to understanding the image. If the image is of text, the description must convey that text to the user. Finally, don’t worry including descriptions to background or purely decorative images.

How do I  write great alternative text?

  • Think about the context
  • Keep it simple
  • Keep it short, like a Tweet

Alt text examples

In the examples below I have included the alt text into the caption as well.

Vidi-Visi and Magic Card accepted
Vidi-Visi and Magic Card accepted

 

Gough Whitlam
Gough Whitlam

 

Forlorn children stare at the rubble that was once their house in wake of the tornado
Forlorn children stare at the rubble that was once their house in wake of the tornado

 

George Washington riding on horseback through Valley Forge in winter.
George Washington riding on horseback through Valley Forge in winter.

 

Total Olympic Gold Medals; USA holds 44% of all gold medals; Russia holds 21% of all gold medals; Great Britain holds 13% of all gold medals; Australia holds 12% of all gold medals; Italy holds 10% of all gold medals.
Total Olympic Gold Medals; USA holds 44% of all gold medals; Russia holds 21% of all gold medals; Great Britain holds 13% of all gold medals; Australia holds 12% of all gold medals; Italy holds 10% of all gold medals.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Inclusive 21C learning spaces

Introduction

Educational institutions have responsibility for maximising the learning outcomes and wellbeing of all learners through providing access to a high-quality education that is free from discrimination. All learners are entitled to quality education experiences, where they:

  • feel included in an environment of high expectation
  • are are both able and enabled to learn.

Inclusive 21 learning spacesTo ensure this occurs, educators need to consider how all learners can perceive, understand, and interact with the physical and digital environment to enable them to easily accomplish their goals.

Nowadays, educators are able to easily achieve their responsibility because:

  • research based strategies in such areas as learner variability, growth mind sets and personalised learning.
  • tech companies such as Apple design and build in a variety of award-winning assistive technologies as standard.
  • app developers such as RedJumper have made it easier and quicker for users to create accessible content.
  • mainstream technologies such as iBeacons are being integrated io make environments more inclusive.

Resources

Downloads

  1. 21st C Inclusive Learning: A PDF of Greg’s webinar

Accessible apps & resources

  1. Web2Access: Resource for selecting accessible ‘Web 2.0’ interactive and collaborate e-learning tools.
  2. Selecting apps is personal!: Not only a process for selecting apps but a cornucopia of expert collections and crowd sourced ideas.
  3. Accessible Digital Office Document (ADOD) Project: This site can help you create accessible office documents and choose accessible office applications for your organization. The guidance is based primarily on WCAG 2.0 and ATAG 1.0.

BYOD accessibility

  1. AppleAccessibility
  2. Microsoft Accessibility
  3. Google Accessibility

Wayfinding / iBeacons

  1. Estimote: Manufacturer of iBeacons
  2. iBeacon Insider

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Autism Acceptance Day

World Autism Day banner

As part of a lead up to World Autism Acceptance Day (Saturday 2 April) here are a range of resources that may be of interest to you: 

For parents

Understanding Autism: The Essential Guide for Parents, Professor Katrina Williams (iBook).
The essential reference for parents and carers of children with autism, written by two leading experts in the field, and covering everything from the causes of autism to how it manifests at the various ages and stages of a child’s life, to diet and nutrition, the importance of self-care for parents, how to cope with common behaviours, conditions that can often appear in conjunction with autism (such as anxiety and depression), and how best to manage the  transition to adulthood.

ASDetect, La Trobe University (app)
ASDetect empowers parents and caregivers to assess the social attention and communication behaviours of their children younger than 2½ years.

For the classroom

Inside Out – Emotions, Aspect Autism Australia (iTunes U)
This iTunes U course helps students learn about emotional regulation by exploring the popular Pixar movie, ‘Inside Out’.

Living with Autism, La Trobe University (podcasts on iTunes U)
How do autism spectrum disorders affect our lives, and what are the developments in diagnosis, treatment and causes? Podcasts from The Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre (OTARC) at La Trobe University.

Minecraft in action. Catch up with CNET’s conversation with Craig Smith where he explains how he is using Minecraft on iPad to help his students “engage in school and build healthy social lives,” by using the game’s “well-defined rules” to “apply those same rules to make sense of real-world situations.”  Craig’s Multi-Touch textbook “for teachers looking to engage their students with iPads and Minecraft” is “available for download in the Apple iBooks Store,” and iPad features extensively in the accompanying images and video.

For lifelong learners

Special Education, The App Store (App collection)
Thanks to the ingenuity of talented developers, the App Store is filled with educational tools designed for people with special needs. Because every learner is unique, we’ve handpicked valuable apps that span a wide range of subjects – from language development to life skills and more.

The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida (audiobook).
The No. 1 Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller. Written by a thirteen year old boy, this remarkable book provides a rare insight into the behaviour of autistic children. Translated from the original Japanese to help others dealing with autism and generally illuminate a little-understood condition. It gives us an exceptional chance to enter the mind of another and see the world from a strange and fascinating perspective.

Aspect Practice Conversations, by Autism Spectrum Australia (podcast)
Interviews a range of experts in the field of autism, with a particular focus on education and building supportive communities

Choiceworks, by Bee Visual (app)
The Choiceworks app is an essential learning tool for helping children complete daily routines, understand & control their feelings and improve their waiting skills. Created with the support of leading hospitals and child development specialists, this app is designed for caregivers to provide clear and consistent support to foster a child’s independence, positive behavior, and emotional regulation at home and in the community. It can also be customised for teachers in a school setting.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

App instructor guides

Apple’s education team have released a  series of free ‘instructor’ guides‘  on the iBooks Store. Inspired by the work of Apple Distinguished Educators (ADEs) in the classroom, these guides provide tips and lesson ideas for using some of their most popular apps across different grade levels and subject areas.  .

Free instructor guides

  1. Explain Everything Lesson Ideas
  2. Hopscotch Lesson Ideas
  3. Stop Motion Studio Lesson Ideas
  4. Eight Elements for Success
  5. Skitch Lesson Ideas
  6. Puppet Pals HD Director’s Pass Lesson Ideas
  7. SketchBook Express Lesson Ideas
  8. Tools for Formative Assessment
  9. View In iTunes
  10. Aurasma Lesson Ideas
  11. Discovering iTunes U Collections
  12. Art Authority Lesson Ideas
  13. Evaluating Apps for the Classroom
  14. Scoodle Jam Lesson Ideas
  15. Tag Journal Lesson Ideas
  16. Keynote for iOS Starter Kit
  17. Discovering Educational Content for iPad
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Martin Pistorius: How my mind came back to life and no one knew

This a repost from TED.

Imagine being unable to say, “I am hungry,” “I am in pain,” “thank you,” or “I love you,” — losing your ability to communicate, being trapped inside your body, surrounded by people yet utterly alone. For 13 long years, that was Martin Pistorius’s reality. After contracting a brain infection at the age of twelve, Pistorius lost his ability to control his movements and to speak, and eventually he failed every test for mental awareness. He had become a ghost. But then a strange thing started to happen — his mind began to knit itself back together. In this moving talk, Pistorius tells how he freed himself from a life locked inside his own body.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Simplicity, complexity, DNA and dark matter

Simplicity, complexity, DNA and dark matter It’s easier to complicate than to simplify. Simple ideas enter the brain quicker and stay there longer. (Saatchi) Simple can be harder than complex. You …

Sourced through Scoop.it from: bristolbrunelleadership.wordpress.com

“Just understand that Simplicity is more than a goal – it’s a skill. To successfully leverage its power, you need to get good at it – simplicity isn’t simple.” (Ken Segall, 2012) Simplicity can be related  to usability and thus productivity. 

See on Scoop.itinclusive solutions

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Style Guide – National Center on Disability and Journalism

The style guide is intended for journalists, communication professionals and members of the general public who are seeking the appropriate and accurate language to use when writing or talking about people living with disabilities. The guide covers general terms and words on physical disabilities, hearing and visual impairments, mental and cognitive disabilities and seizure disorders. Entries are listed in alphabetical order. Click on the index above to jump to entries that begin with that letter.

Each entry includes a definition of the word or term, a summary of how it is used or viewed by disability groups and guidance, when available, from The Associated Press Stylebook. Finally, each entry includes the NCDJ recommendation, which strives for accuracy and aims to strike a balance between clarity and sensitivity.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: ncdj.org

This  style guide is useful for anyone seeking the appropriate and accurate language to use when writing or talking about people living with disabilities. Whilst there are many U.S specific references it is easily contextualised for use in other countries.

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Switch Control Overview

Switch guru, Christopher Hills shares his deep and authentic knowledge about Switch Control in this brilliant video. In his video, Chris demonstrates an overview of three ways Switch Control can work to suit different needs. You can connect with Chris via his Twitter account

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Hail EPUB and vale PDF

I would like to share some key points about the need to move away from PDFs as a format for providing information in an accessible format .
 

In short

We live in a post PC world and PDFs are not up to standard as an appropriate accessible format that works consistently across both desktop and mobile devices. In fact relying on PDFs puts an organisation at risk.
 

Background

PDFs have been around since 1992. The heritage of this file format is the desktop not mobile devices. Whilst PDFs can be made accessible and can work well in a desktop environment, the  significant lack of mobile screen reader support for PDF means that PDF’s aren’t really accessible on mobile devices.  There is also an all round usability as well as accessibility issue of trying to read PDFs designed for a desktop device on a mobile device.
 
EPUB3 is a free and open e-book standard that is the logical replacement for PDFs as it is the most accessible and flexible format with a wide array of free EPUB readers across all major platforms.  From a technical perspective EPUB 3 is based on the open web platform and HTML5 which is also shared by the DAISY format. EPUBs can also be read offline. Offline formats are vital as one of the biggest equity issues is the cost of and access to cheap internet services particularly in rural areas.

Key Australian Government Advice

  • The Department of Finance and the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) consider the lack of accessibility support for PDF in the mobile environment to be a significant issue. In 2013, they reinforced the Government’s existing position that Agencies should publish their documents in HTML, with an accessible PDF optionally provided, except in limited circumstances.
  • The Australian Human Rights Commission’s (AHRC) current advice, (February 2014), is that PDF cannot be regarded as a sufficiently accessible format to provide a user experience for a person with a disability that is equivalent to that available to a person without a disability. In fact the AHRC’s Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) Advisory Notes highlight that  “…organisations that publish documents only in PDF risk complaint under the DDA unless they make the content available in at least one additional format and in a manner that incorporates principles of accessible document design.”

A way forward

The Australian Government’ s Digital Transformation Office (DTO) has recently released the Digital Service Standards (DSS) which have a strong emphasis on user-centred design and inclusive services. The Standards establish the criteria that all Australian digital government services must meet to ensure they are simpler, faster and easier for everyone to use. The DSS are a more holistic approach to the future of accessibility. Whilst it acknowledges the WCAG 2.0 as a foundation, it encourages a shift away from a ‘checkbox’ approach towards a framework for continuous improvement.

Recommendations

  • All online documents should published in HTML first. The HTML should be HTML 5 compliant capable of operating consistently across desktop and mobile devices.
  • All documents that are published to be downloaded and interacted with offline should be published in the EPUB3 format. 

So hail EPUB and vale PDF!

End note

My preferred EPUB authoring tool is Apple’s free iBooks Author v2.3 which includes includes new EPUB templates. These new templates allow content to be exported to EPUB 3 to create media-rich, reflowable ebooks which can be viewed in any ebook reader that supports EPUB 3.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Apple Watch an accessibility success!

Apple watch, displaying voice over reading a message.

Yes, it is smart, sexy and accessible!

Accessibility is part of Apple’s DNA and the new Watch is living proof that inclusion inspires innovation. Following in depth briefings this week, accessibility influencers Steven Aquino in the US, Vision Australia’s David Woodbridge and AppleVis UK’s David Goodwin write positively finding Apple Watch offers “a range of features to meet the needs of people with a wide variety of disabilities.” Steven Aquino writing for iMore says Apple Watch is “bound to have far-reaching effects on users with disabilities” with praise for features like the Extra Large watch face, Zoom and the Digital Crown. He says the Taptic Engine “is profound” for someone with hearing loss and calls the Apple Watch app a “great accessibility tool.”

Writing for AppleVis, an influential web site for the visually impaired and blind community, David Goodwin posts an in-depth look at Apple Watch accessibility features. Vision Australia’s David Woodbridge writes for AppleVis saying, “this is the first truly accessible mainstream smart watch,” and adds, “VoiceOver access on the Apple Watch far exceeded my expectations.” Woodbridge calls haptic feedback for Maps “exciting” for the visual impaired saying, “The watch vibrates using a different pattern to let you know when you need to turn left or right to reach your destination.”

Find out more

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

How accessible is the Internet?

Disability. It’s the thing no one thinks about on the Internet, the issue covered least on most major news sites. It’s not just that disability is ignored or only discussed in passing or that rare coverage of disability is often filled with outdated and offensive language, themes, and attitudes; the Web itself is often entirely inaccessible to disabled people. – See more at: http://kernelmag.dailydot.com/issue-sections/headline-story/11421/disability-web-accessibility-design/#sthash.XIYsoqhV.dpuf

Source: kernelmag.dailydot.com

A great article from a mainstream site. I love the quote..

"Twenty-four years after the Americans with Disabilities Act, we’re struggling to get Web accessibility right. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Good design doesn’t need to come at the cost of accessibility or vice versa; in fact, the best design is universal design, implemented so everyone can use it. The tools are out there, from design guides to entire websites dedicated to the subject. It’s up to the Internet to rise to the challenge. We need to do better."

 I would rephrase the last section as "It’s up to all of us to rise to the challenge. We can and will do better."

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The power of captions

Videos can be a powerful medium by which to explain ideas and demonstrate concepts. Adding closed captions to the video ensures any user can perecive meaning from it. It also makes the video a more usable experience for all users as well as achieving compliance with both the Department of Premier and Cabinet circular C2012-08 and the Disability Standards for Education (2005).

Captioned video displayed on an iPhone

What are captions?

Captions are the on-screen, text version of a video soundtrack. Captions are used to communicate not only for dialogue but also for sounds and music. Captions can appear on many forms of video formats including TV programs, DVDs, online videos, podcasts and at mainstream cinema. There are two types of captions, closed and open. Closed captions appear only when the user turns on that feature.

Most major computers and tablet devices support captions. As an example both Apple OS X and iOS systems enable you to watch movies, TV shows, videos and podcasts using closed captioning, using apps like iTunes, QuickTime and DVD Player. You can also buy or rent captioned movies from the iTunes Store or find captioned podcasts in iTunes U. Just look for the small CC icon!  Both Apple OS X and iOS allow users to personalise how they want the captions to look, simply by adjusting the different caption styles and fonts.

OSX caption preferences

Why are captions important?

Captions are essential for learners who are deaf and hard of hearing to gain meaning from the message of video. Captions are also an be very beneficial to individuals learning English as a second language, or  learners with reading and literacy problems. In fact everyone can benefit from captions.

How captions benefit all learners

There is a long list of educational benefits to using captions. Below is a compendium of the benefits collated from sites such as Media Access Australiacap that! and the U.S Described and Captioned Media Program.

  • Captions help children with word identification, meaning, acquisition, and retention.
  • Reading captions motivates viewers to read more and read more often.
  • Captions can help children establish a systematic link between the written word and the spoken word.
  • Pre-readers, by becoming familiar with captions, will have familiar signposts when they begin reading print-based material.
  • Captions compensate for noisy backgrounds or where sound isn’t allowed.
  • Captions provide a solution for poor audio quality.
  • Captions enable learners to quickly browse the video by reading the associated text as they drag the controller as the captions are always visible.
  • Captions enable learners to see the correct spellings of people, places, and things.
  • Captions provide missing information for individuals who have difficulty processing speech and auditory components of the visual media (regardless of whether this difficulty is due to a hearing loss or a cognitive delay).
  • Captions meet or exceed the W3C Web Accessibility Guidelines as well as state and federal disability legislation.
  • Captions can become part of a search engine.
  • Captions provide additional support for learners from a non english speaking background.
  • Captions make your content fully accessible to people who have hearing loss.

Learn more about captioning

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Recommended iBooks

Supporting diverse learners

The following books are available for free on the iBooks Store.

 

Challenge Based Learning

‘Big Ideas’ Series

One Best Thing Series

One Best Thing is a collection of books created by Apple Distinguished Educators (ADEs) that demonstrate the use of Apple technologies to transform teaching ​and learning. Each One Best Thing book shares a unit, a lesson, or a best practice and is designed to help another educator implement a successful practice. It’s a professional learning idea championed by an educator—in word and action—that others can look to for ideas and tips on how to replicate. Some examples are:

Further reading

Check out the related posts

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

iPad Model Classroom

In this book Craig Smith, Aspect Practice Specialist with Autism Spectrum Australia (and Apple Distinguished Educator), takes readers on a journey through a week in an iPad Model Classroom. Each day of the week is abound with a showcase of innovative best practice ideas and learning activities to help educators creatively implement iPad in their classrooms. Special attention is given to the needs of learners on the autism spectrum, with core competency areas pertaining to autism education discussed throughout.

iPad Model Classroom is full of practical ideas and wonderful insights. It is an excellent edition to any educators professional library. It is freely available on the iBooks Store. 

 

Craig SmithAbout Craig

Craig has worked at Autism Spectrum Australia for the past eight years. He has worked as a classroom teacher, an educational outreach consultant, and as a school coordinator. He has presented keynote presentations on autism, technology and pedagogy at national and international conferences, and has been featured on ABC Radio National as an autism education authority. Craig is  is completing his PhD studies in Special Education at the University of Newcastle

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

An introduction into eBooks

In July 2010, ebook sales on Amazon surpassed hardcover book sales, and then six months later beat the paperback books sales rate. An Ebook is a generic term for any digital representation of a book. This  includes formats such as PDF, HTML, ASCII text, Word, DTB aongst others, as well as EPUB. An EPUB is a file format for representing documents in digital form. EPUB is an open and evolving format defined by the Open eBook Forum of the International Digital Publishing Forum. Ebooks and in particular EPUBS are transforming reading patterns in the classroom.

Cross platform general lists of tools

  1. eBook authoring software – usually more flexible as they are designed to create ePubs
  2. eBook reading software – available for so many devices  / platforms. 
  3. eBook conversion software – reasonably flexible as they are designed to import you existing document and convert it into a ePub. 
  4. eBook Creation and Publications – A Pintrest collection.

Further reading

Check out the related posts

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Typographic design

There are many information design decisions that we make as part of the process of creating high quality learning resources. These range from selecting age appropriate content,  through to the structure of the information as well as graphical design issues.

Many teachers wrongly apply paper-based design rules when designing digital resources.  This inadvertently causes barriers for learners. There are several key differences between paper and digital which greatly effects:

  • How we interact with the content,
  • Our efficiency in comprehending the content,
  • Our capacity for sustained low effort interaction with the content.

Research has highlighted that implementing paper-based design rules in a digital environment can decrease reading efficiency by as much as 25%!

What follows are some of the default text-based onscreen design rules for digital devices that you can easily implement to improve student engagement and comprehension.

font elementsRules of Thumb

  • Page layout: landscape layouts fit the computer or tablet screen and cut down on scrolling. If you are designing for mobiles then portrait layout is best.
  • Font:  San serif fonts such as Verdana have a higher readability quotient on screen than serif fonts such as Times New Roman. This is because San serif fonts are easier to read and in particular for fonts such as Verdana the height of the lowercase x is much taller.
  • Font size: Increasing from a minimum12pt to 14pt for paragraphs improves comprehension as it helps to compensate for the fact that computer screens display  information at a lower resolution than paper.
  • Font colour: When elements on the page are too light (or dark), they can hinder the legibility of content. This can become a distraction or a barrier as some students will spend excess energy straining to see the text.
  • Line spacing: A spacing of 1.3 – 1.5 increases the whitespace between each line and improves readability.
  • Characters per line: A maximum limit of 60 characters per line cuts down on readers getting lost moving from line to line. (Lower the character with a lower reading age.)
  • Paragraph justification: A left justification mirrors general reading behaviour and increases readability. Centre or fully justified decrease readability.
  • Paragraph styles: Using clearly defined paragraph styles (eg: heading 1, heading 2, default, body) improves the document structure which improves comprehension as well embedding data which supports screen reading devices.
  • Paragraph Orphans: Single words or short phrases left to sit alone at the end of a paragraph are called widows. If they are left to sit alone at the beginning of a paragraph, they are called orphans. Both draw unnecessary visual attention to themselves, which can distract the reader.
  • Writing style: Content should be concise, objective and scannable. It should also use:
    • Highlighted keywords (hypertext links serve as one form of highlighting; typeface variations and colour are others) meaningful sub-headings (not “clever” ones).
    • A conversational style using first and second person which is easier to understand.
    • Bulleted lists
    • One idea per paragraph (users will skip over any additional ideas if they are not caught by the first few words in the paragraph)
    • The inverted pyramid style, starting with the conclusion.
    • Half the word count (or less) than conventional writing.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

What can teachers learn from great marketing campaigns?

No matter what profession you are in, we can all benefit from fresh perspectives. Sometimes the best ideas comes from outside the profession or organisation as it creates a shift in our thinking about the situation or task.  So what can teachers  learn from great marketing campaigns? Not the dodgy cheap and nasty advertisements but the memorable ones that we can recall easily and stick with us. So….’c’mon aussie’..have a think about this and then..’you oughta be congratulated!’

Great marketing campaigns

  • Plan using good data
  • Know their audience
  • Clear aim to change how we think, feel or act
  • Use emotion
  • Understand the relative positive & negatives of the communication channels (video, print, radio)
  • Tightly focussed messaging
  • Tightly review the effectiveness of the campaign

Useful resources

NSWDEC Communication and Engagement Directorate have a great set of communication planning tools on the NSWDEC intranet that are worth examining and considering how you might repurpose those for classroom use.

Case study – Snickers

Below are two different Snickers Ads. One from Australia, the other international. It is interesting to see a common message presented across different contexts.

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

ePub tools for iPads

There are a range of apps that enable learners to create and publish their own ePubs directly from their iPad. Here are some examples.

Case Study

A look at Book Creator for the iPad

Book Creator for the iPad from Red Jumper Studio on Vimeo.

Further reading

Check out the related posts

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Consistent teacher judgement of learning materials

C0-authors: Greg Alchin & Lisa Tonkin

Introduction

The core quality benchmarks for any learning material is that all learners are able to use and engage with the material on the same basis from the start.  This involves curating or creating resources that all learners can perceive, understand, and utilise to accomplish their educational goals.

This process is underpinned by a high quality learning experience design framework, which encompasses learning theory, content expertise, visual design, information design, interaction design and usability.  The criteria and questions outlined below are based upon psychological research and are technology neutral due to the dynamic nature of technological change.  The criteria and questions are also consistent with:

Learning Experience

How does the overall design engage, sustain and extend any learner to grow from novice to expert learners?  In particular, how can any learner easily:

  • perceive and understand the content and navigational elements of the learning material?
  • interact and control the content and navigational elements of the learning material?
  • engage with the content and concepts in flexible and/or multiple modalities?

How is the instructional design consistent with the:

  • core content and concepts?
  • target demographics?
  • published format and mode of delivery?

Purpose

How does any learner easily:

  • understand the purpose of the learning material?
  • identify how the material links to the syllabus outcomes?
  • identify the goal(s) of the learning material and specific learner outcomes

Expectations

How can any learner easily identify the:

  • indicative amount of time to allocate to the task/s?
  • resources required to complete the task/s?
  • required high expectations and higher order thinking?

Sequence

How is any learner able to easily:

  • identify authorship, currency and perspective of the material?
  • connect the material to their prerequisite knowledge?
  • identify the logical sequence of the learning narrative / journey?
  • access and gain meaning from the semantic (hierarchical) structure of the material?
  • locate and use specific sections or ‘chunks’ of content?
  • identify and connect core content with cross-curriculum priorities and general capabilities?
  • critically reflect upon the required values and attitudes, skills, knowledge and understanding through multiple modalities?

Mastery

How does any learner easily:

  • understand key terms and concepts the first time they are encountered within the learning material?
  • accomplish basic tasks within the learning materials the first time they are encountered?
  • gain immediate feedback of their understanding of key content and concepts?
  • recover from an error / misunderstanding?
  • share ideas, challenge thinking and participate in substantive communication?
  • develop the required values and attitudes, skills, knowledge and understanding through completing the activities?
  • clarify and apply their understanding of the content and concepts through higher-level tasks?

Assessment

How does any learner easily:

  • recognise that the assessable tasks link to syllabus outcomes?
  • choose flexible options to apply and demonstrate their skills, knowledge and understanding?
  • identify the assessment criteria to be applied to the assessable tasks?

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Digital style guide

All digital education content (created / curated) must comply with the Disability Standards for Education. To achieve this, it must be discoverable and usable from the start by any learner to enable them actively participate on the same basis on the device of their choice. 

Creation / curation

  1. All content and systems must meet the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines v2 (WCAG 2) Level AA to ensure that any learner can perceive, operate and understand irrespective of what accessibility preferences they have enabled on their device.
  2. Online content should be HTML5 + CSS3 compliant, requiring no additional plug ins. It should also be presented in responsive formats so that it can easily and logically reflow depending upon the device screen size and orientation.

File formats

  1. Audio formats should be in either .mp3 or .m4a format.
  2. Video formats should be in either .mp4 or .m4v format.
  3. Document formats should be in either ePUB, rtf, .docx, .xlsx and .pptx e
  4. Graphics and images formats should be in either .gif, .jpeg, .png or .svg formats.
  5. eBook formats should be in either EPUB or PDF format. EPUB is the preferred format. EPUB readers should be able to read EPUBv3 or higher.
  6. Browsers must be HTML5 + CSS3 compliant

Storage

  1. File and directory names Use lowercase alphanumeric characters, and underscore or hyphen for separation. Do not use the space character in filenames, nor ampersand (&) or any other special characters. Naming structures should be logical and consistent to improve discoverability.
  2. Draft / trial teacher created content can be saved on a shared cloud storage system (eg Google Drive, 365/OneDrive, iCloud) whilst final versions should be stored in Aurora’s digital repository / Equella Collection.
  3. Meta Tags should be used for all content as an additional means of improving discoverability. Minimum tags should relate to Year level, subject, concept.
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Conditions of collaboration

An essential skill of modern work and learning environments is the need to collaborate. There are many conversation tools that enable collaboration, but what are the mindsets and behaviour that builds collaboration? Listed below are the essential qualities to build a collaborative culture.

  • Share a common goal or purpose
  • Communicate easily with common vocabulary
  • Have ownership
  • Have something at risk or something to lose
  • Build familiarity
  • Let go and don’t take things personally
  • Listen deeply
  • Adapt quickly: accept reality and do what needs to be done
  • Give and take control
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Spotlight on Christopher Hills

Christopher Hills is an up and coming video editor who is not defined by his disability. Chris is an Apple Certified Pro Final Cut Pro X specialist and an Accessibility Ambassador. Chris calls himself a geek with cerebral palsy. He uses the inbuilt single switch access in his Mac Book Pro and iPad to run his own video editing business. Chris believes he is more powerful than you think.

You can follow Chris on Twitter @iAmMaccing

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

How to start collaborating among schools

The talk about modern literacies… about becoming a globally connected educator… and having your students collaborate with peers from around the world is great…. BUT how do you actually DO it? Let’s take a specific look at steps you can take to make it happen and look at plenty of examples of learning in and out of the classroom. Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano outlines 6 steps to start collaborating among schools:

  1. Build a Professional Development Hub
  2. Document
  3. Share
  4. Feedback
  5. Connect
  6. Learn Together

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Understanding collaboration

More than ever, how we play, learn and work involves working with others to engage in meaningful productive activity. Collaboration enables us to share resources, ideas and perspectives, build consensus and achieve shared goals. As such it can increase the success of teams as they engage in collaborative problem solving. Collaboration also allows us to leverage new relationships by taking advantage of the capabilities and skill sets unique to each individual.

The wide array of apps and online tools that enable collaboration blur the distinction between face to face, blended and online contexts of collaboration. Despite the many benefits of collaboration, many struggle to ensure successful collaborations. As teachers we need to master the:

  • Mindsets and behaviours for collaboration,
  • Fluencies required to engage in and sustain collaboration.
  • Subtle but important differences between face to face, blended and online contexts of collaboration.
  • Apps, online tools and workflows that support collaboration

Mindsets and behaviour for collaboration

  • Share a common goal or purpose
  • Communicate easily with common vocabulary
  • Have mutual   ownership
  • Have something at risk or something to lose
  • Build familiarity
  • Let go and don’t take things personally
  • Listen deeply
  • Adapt quickly: accept reality and do what needs to be done
  • Give and take control

The identified mindsets and behaviour are essential for both informal and formal types of collaboration. For more formal types of collaboration an understanding of the skills and action surrounding collaborative fluency is beneficial to success.

Collaborative fluency

Crockett, Jukes and Churches (2013) in their seminal work ‘21st Century Fluencies for the Digital Age’ identified what they defined as the 5 Es of Collaboration fluency. The 5 Es provide a useful framework for the phases of collaboration.  Teasing out each Fluency highlights the requisite skills that individuals should possess to easily transform their intent into action.  The 5 Es are:

  • Establish the collective, and determine the best role for each team member by pinpointing each team member’s personal strengths and expertise, establishing norms, and the signing of a group contract that indicates both a collective working agreement and an acceptance of the individual responsibilities and accountability of each team member.
  • Envision the outcome, examining the issue, challenge, and goal as a group.
  • Engineer a workable plan to achieve the goal.
  • Execute by putting the plan into action and managing the process.
  • Examine the process and the end result for areas of constructive improvement.

Selecting collaborative tools

Selecting a set of tools appropriate to your needs depends greatly upon aligning the:

  • Context and purpose of the collaboration,
  • Capability of the tool,
  • Intuitive design of the tools to ensure it is easy to use, regardless of the users’ experience or knowledge,
  • Flexibility of the tool to enable a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.
  • Capacity to work across a range of devices.

NB: All digital tools experience connectivity problems from time to time, therefore you always need a Plan B if your use of a tool is time sensitive, such as a meeting or classroom lesson.

A.      Supporting the use of collaborative tools

The successful use of any new set of tools is also connected to some form of support system. Support can involve:

  • technical or trouble shooting advice and / or
  • connection to a learning community focused on the better use of the tool.

Just as the tools of collaboration are changing, so too is the nature of support. It is important not to confuse centrally managed or central permission to use a tool with a centrally delivered support system. This is because most commercially available collaborative tools provide their own technical support systems and connection to a learning community.

B.     Questions to ask when selecting a collaborative tool

Does the collaborative tool:

  • Have the features you want for the required task/s?
  • Allow authentication using your Department Portal ID?
  • Securely manage login and account user information?
  • Integrate with other collaborative tools?
  • Work across a range of devices and platforms? (eg:PC/Mac laptops, iOS and Google mobile devices)
  • Connect to a support system?
  • Include a specific area or version for use by students
Tool Audience Notes
Video conferencing StudentsStaff –    Video conferencing system-    Integral component of the Interactive Classroom projects well as the Connection (Virtual Excursions) project.-    Collaborate via dedicated VC units or via mobile apps when external to DEC network.
Adobe Connect StudentsStaff –    Web conferencing platform for web meetings, eLearning, and webinars-    Collaborate via browser or mobile apps
Bridgit StudentsStaff –    Desktop sharing and IWB collaboration-    Collaborate via desktop and mobile apps
Yammer Staff –    Allows for public and private groups-    Integrates closely with Office 365-    Collaborate via browser or mobile apps
Office 365 StudentsStaff –    Online productivity suite enables shared creation / editing of documents.-    Integrates closely with Yammer (staff only)-    Collaborate via browser or mobile apps
Google Docs StudentsStaff –    Online productivity suite enables shared creation / editing of documents.-    Collaborate via browser or mobile apps
Share.schools Staff –    Digital repository powered by Equella.-    Publicly searchable-    Appropriate for teacher created-    Collaborate via browser
Scootle Staff –    Digital repository powered by Equella.-    Publicly searchable-    Appropriate for centrally developed and / or approved quality assured resources-    Collaborate via browser

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools

 to see the expanded list of Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools available. This certainly makes it easier for content creators and administrators to ensure that their These Web accessibility evaluation tools are software programs or online services that help determine if web content meets accessibility guidelines. Information about features of evaluation tools that help with evaluation is in Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The interactive eBook dilemma: embed video directly, or link out using HTML widgets

Books on Monday: each Monday TNM looks at books and book publishing – either a new book on the publishing industry, a new digital book release, or industry news Digital …

Source: www.talkingnewmedia.com

Given the cost (and variability) of data access in Australia embed is the way to go. Also having to wait too long for video to download impacts on the user experience. The issue for authors / publishers is thinking about what content is best communicated in what format. Then if one is using video there is the need for good compression.

See on Scoop.itePUBs in Education

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Dispatches from IDPF Digital Book 2014, Pt. 3: DRM | Copyright and Technology

The final set of interesting developments at last week’s IDPF Digital Book 2014 in NYC has to do with DRM and rights. DRM may disappear from trade e-books. But will that happen for the right reasons.

 

DRM has become something of a taboo subject even at conferences like this, so most of the rest of the discussion about it took the form of hallway buzz.  And the buzz is that many are predicting that DRM will be on its way out for retail trade e-books within the next couple of years.

Source: copyrightandtechnology.com

This will be have an interesting move. I wonder what the impact will be educational institutions?

See on Scoop.itePUBs in Education

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Adobe Digital Editions Rolls Out Private Beta for ePUB3 | Good-eReader

For fans of both Adobe Digital Editions ebook reading platform and the ePUB3 format, long-awaited good news is on its way. Adobe’s adoption of the ePUB3 standards is currently in private beta, and some sources say that full adoption for the public will be coming as early as the fall.

 

According to an announcement from the IDPF, “The industry rollout of EPUB 3 support has taken another big step forward with private beta releases of Adobe Digital Editions (ADE) desktop reading software and Adobe Reader Mobile SDK (RMSDK), both supporting EPUB 3 via the open source Readium SDK project. The beta releases support both fixed layout and reflowable content, audio and video playing, MathML, JavaScript in and outside of iFrames, multiple rendition EPUBs, and much more. The software is also designed to be compatible with the recently launched InDesign CC EPUB 3 fixed-layout support.

Source: goodereader.com

This is a much welcomed move and not before time. Now all we need to do is make sure is that authors and publishers alike create accessible content.

See on Scoop.itePUBs in Education

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

InDesign CC 2014 review: Better e-book tools, easier workflows | PCWorld

InDesign’s new ePub tools opens the digital book market to a giant new group of authors, and improvements to often-used features in InDesign will ease the workflow of a large number of design.

 

In reviews of previous versions of InDesign, the looming question was always, “Is this version worth the cost of the upgrade or can I skip it?” But with Adobe’s switch to the Creative Cloud subscription model, this question is meaningless. Every subscriber receives the latest version as soon as it’s available.

Source: www.pcworld.com

There are some welcome features in the latest version of InDesign. That said my tools of choice remain Apple’s  iBooks Author and Pages. Both of which are intuitive,  powerful and FREE! Pages is great for creating ePubs.

See on Scoop.itePUBs in Education

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Fewer Full-Sized Courses. More learning snacks, ePubs, Videos, and Reference Tools

This is an excerpt from Sharon Boller’s newest white paper, Learning Trends, Technologies and Opportunities. The white paper describes today’s learning landscape…

Source: www.bottomlineperformance.com

As we move to "byte sized" learning snacks the need for discoverability (meta tagging) increases.  The need for social collation & curation tools with interoperability is the part of the key.

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The 6-step guide to flipping your classroom – Daily Genius

It’s one of the most talked-about trends in education right now. Right behind the iPad and Common Core. Flipping your classroom is a trend that doesn’t seem to be going away any time soon. That’s great, because it offers a lot of advantages for your classroom regardless of your students’ age or what subject matter you’re presenting in your classroom. If you’re new to the concept, flipping your classroom can feel a little bit overwhelming: How much should I switch around? What is best for the classroom vs at home? Why am I doing this again anyway?

Source: dailygenius.com

A useful and clear info graphic . My addendum would be that

prior to planning the flipped material, teachers should be aware of the barriers associated with the curriculum as it related to learner variability within their classroom.

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Assistive technology puts creativity within reach

Teenager Christopher Hills has found IT solutions to some profound physical barriers.

Source: www.smh.com.au

This is why I am so passionate about assistive technology and in particular the work Apple has done for so many years to build inclusive features within their products. It is about empowering people to participate on the same basis. I am honoured to know Chris. For anyone looking at getting some videos edited, Chris is your man! He is a serious video editor whom I can learn a lot from.  

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Learning to Teach Online

Learning to Teach Online is a free online class taught by Simon McIntyre and Negin Mirriahi of UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales). Based upon the successful educational resources of the same name, the Learning to Teach Online (LTTO) MOOC is designed to help existing educators establish or improve their own online or blended teaching practices. The target audience is primarily teachers in higher education, K-12, community college, and vocational or private education.

Source: www.coursera.org

If you are looking to invest in your skills to teach online, this free course could be the one for you. It lasts 8 weeks and will take about 3 hours per week to complete each module.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The Twitteraholic’s Ultimate Guide to tweets, hashtags, and all things Twitter

Most educators who learn to use Twitter effectively say they learn more from their personal learning network (PLN) on Twitter than they’ve achieved from any other forms of professional development …

Source: theedublogger.com

Another great guide from the team at Edublogger! Well worth a read if you really want to make the most out of the twitter for PLNs!.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

A Handy Interactive Visual on The Digital Storytelling Process ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Here is a great interactive Thinglink image on the process of digital storytelling I want to share with you today. This graphic is created by Tonia and features a wide variety of iPad apps that go with each of the stages of the digital storytelling process.

Source: www.educatorstechnology.com

Great appsmash with a purpose.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Monday at ACC TechnoCamp | Anne Carlsen TechnoCamp 2014

Dwayne Szot from Zot Artz – Artz for all doing a huge adapted art project. In this pic Dwayne is pushing student with a “Give it a whirl” mounted on the front of her chair. Also  at the camp are ADE’s Adam Goldberg and Dr Luis Pèrez. Adam is doing some fantastic music activities using iPads. Luis who is legally blind is an avid photographer and videographer!

Source: www.acctechnocamp.org

The Anne Carlsen Center truly is dedicated to “Nurturing abilities. Changing lives.” The TechnoCamps are just another example of the brilliant work they do!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Google Play changes open the door to rogue developers

Used to just clicking “yes” to pesky app permission requests? Then this Android change affects you.

Source: www.smh.com.au

Google’s change to the Google Play store that could open the door for rogue developers to trick smartphone users into giving apps more permissions than they should! Sadly, this is ANOTHER serious in a long line of Android security risks. Why would you buy something that increases security risks?

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Making Games: The Ultimate Project-Based Learning

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Game making is one way to create a space where students are empowered to freely experiment with their own way of framing ideas and choosing perspectives. In this way, game making is tantamount to project-based learning.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Game design is a powerful means by which learners can create and demonstrate their understanding. It is learning AS assessment through play. A wealth of resources here on the Mind/Shift site!

See on blogs.kqed.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

See the You in You | Rethinking Learning – Barbara Bray

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Sarah sings Let it Go her way sharing what it is like to live with autism. All of us need to tell our own stories. We need to be able to see the person first not the disability or challenge.We need to change our education system so each of us become the best we can be.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Barbara’s reflections about Sarah’s song reinforces the point that to be an effective educator you must truly know your learners. To quote Atticus Finch: ‘If you just learn a single trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.’

See on barbarabray.net

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

A Touch of Light

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

“You don’t have to see to have vision.” That is the author’s motto as a person with a significant visual impairment who uses photography to educate others on the importance of inclusive design. This book focuses on the what, why and how of adaptive photography with iOS devices. A number of video tutorials show how the author is able to capture, edit and share photos with the help of the accessibility features built into iOS devices and a number of photography apps. A framework for incorporating photography into inclusive classroom activities is also discussed. 

 

Read a sample or download A Touch of Light by Perez, Luis with iBooks.

 

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Luis Perez’s iBook "A Touch of Light" is a touch of brilliance. Learning about the what, why and how of adaptive photography with iOS devices through Luis’s powerful and empowering personal story is a powerful read.

See on itunes.apple.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

▶ Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion – YouTube

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’…

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

The power and importance of building and sustaining relationships with all learners. Seeking first to understand the learner.

See on www.youtube.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Questioning – Top Ten Strategies – HuntingEnglish

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein Questioning is the very…

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

The art of posing thought provoking questions is a cornerstone to creating a ‘culture of inquiry’  that opens minds and stimulates truly independent thought.

See on www.huntingenglish.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Making ebooks in Pages 5.2: Here’s what works now (and what still doesn’t) | Macworld

See on Scoop.iteBookED

After nearly four years of stagnation, Pages’s ebook export tools have recently received several promising updates. Macworld’s resident ebook expert Serenity Caldwell takes a look at what’s changed (and what’s still broken).

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

In a BYOD world as much as I love iBooks Author and the awesomeness of multi-touch ebooks, the ability to create a document that is "ePub 3" compliant, allows a wider audience beyond those possessing only iPad or Mavericks OS.

See on www.macworld.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

How to Select iPad Apps for Students with Visual Impairments | Paths to Literacy

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Considerations for choosing iPad apps for students with visual impairments, including book apps, and other suggested apps.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

It is always worthwhile having a consistent framework for making selections about apps. This is a  useful list of considerations. One I would add to it is "Does the app work with VoiceOver or other accessibility settings?

My personal list of app selection criteria are based upon the apps capacity to enable:

1. Content can be displayed flexibly

2. Personalised operation (works with accessibility settings)

3. Support for developing understanding

4. Easy recovery from mistakes

5. Capacity for collaboration

See on www.pathstoliteracy.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Google Docs | AccessAbility

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Google Docs are a commonly used web-based word processing tool. Because of the collaborative nature of the application, it is especially important that your shared files are as accessible as possible, so that all users who need to access the document can comprehend the content. 

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Google Docs may be growing in popularity but it is missing some key accessibility functions. As Penn State points out "Google Docs is not recommended for sharing documents with images and/or tables." All educators need to be aware of these glaring disabling deficiencies. Use with caution.  Google really need to lift their game on this.

See on accessibility.psu.edu

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Simplicity, complexity, DNA and dark matter

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Simplicity, complexity, DNA and dark matter It’s easier to complicate than to simplify. Simple ideas enter the brain quicker and stay there longer. (Saatchi) Simple can be harder than complex. You …

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

“Just understand that Simplicity is more than a goal – it’s a skill. To successfully leverage its power, you need to get good at it – simplicity isn’t simple.” (Ken Segall, 2012) Simplicity can be related  to usability and thus productivity. 

See on bristolbrunelleadership.wordpress.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Jimmy Fallon and Billy Joel take an iPad app for an incredible ride

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Last night’s Tonight Show was one for the ages. Jimmy Fallon introduced Billy Joel to a beatboxing iPad app called Loopy HD. Watch the video. Magic.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Music is a universal language. The beauty of iPad apps like Loopy HD is how ease by which you can create powerful and engaging pieces even if you can’t read music notation or play an instrument..

See on www.loopinsight.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Photo Education – Accessible Photography through Switch Access in iOS 7 – TheAppWhisperer

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

We are delighted to publish the second tutorial to our brand new section within theappwhisperer – Photo Education & Accessibility. There are many photographers and artists with special needs, whether…

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Switch accessible photography is another example of what is possible using the inbuilt power of Apple technology. Many thanks to Apple Distinguished Educator, Dr Luis Perez for sharing his expertise. Luis is an international expert on accessibility and inclusive design, and author of Mobile Learning for All from Corwin Press. His work has appeared in THE Journal, The Loop Magazine, and the New York Times Bits Blog. You can learn more about Luis’s work in educational technology by visiting his website at www.luisperezonline.com. #ADE #plearnchat #UDLchat @_luisfperez

See on theappwhisperer.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Creative Educator – The Power of Play

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

The pendulum swings back and forth in education. Waiting at one end of the arc is a myopic focus on academics and accountability, often in the form of high-stakes testing. Fueled by a fear of “falling behind,” learning environments that encourage exploration and experimentation are pushed aside in favor of early academics, more homework, and correct answers on bubble sheets.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

The idea that play is incompatible with, or the opposite of, learning is a misconception. Play benefits physical, emotional, cognitive, and social development. Play has Flow (Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi ) Or as Mark Twain said “Work and play are words used to describe the same thing under differing conditions.”

See on creativeeducator.tech4learning.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

iHouse | Vision2014

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Split into four zones the iHouse will replicate a vision impaired persons’ experience in the home with the assistance of the latest accessible technology.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Every Apple device not only has accessible features — but accessible principles — built in. This is inclusion by universal design that recognises and respects the human dignity of all users. Now lets take the concept of the iHouse and embed the philosophy in every school.

See on www.vision2014.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

What’s New and Changed for Blind and Low Vision Users in iOS 7.1 | AppleVis

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

iOS 7.1 is now available for download via Over-the-Air Update and iTunes.   Since November of last year, members of the AppleVis Editorial Team have been busy testing iOS 7.1 in all stages of the beta process.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

The new and changed accessibility features in iOS 7.1 are impressive and build upon an already highly enabling system.

See on applevis.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Hattie’s Index Of Teaching & Learning Strategies: 39 Effect Sizes In Ascending Order

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Hattie’s Index Of Teaching & Learning Strategies: 39 Effect Sizes In Ascending Order

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

"Every study has a story, and every strategy and impacting agent has a background." It is worth teasing out and reflecting upon the comments listed on the right hand side of notes.

See on www.teachthought.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Minimize Cognitive Load to Maximize Usability | Nielsen Norman Group

See on Scoop.iteBookED

The total cognitive load, or amount of mental processing power needed to use your site, affects how easily users find content and complete tasks.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Greg Alchin’s insight:

To improve learner comprehension and engagement, educators should:
1. Implement strategies to support intrinsic cognitive load such as adding glossaries.
2. Minimise extraneous cognitive load thorough clear consistent design,

See on www.nngroup.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Minimize Cognitive Load to Maximize Usability | Nielsen Norman Group

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

The total cognitive load, or amount of mental processing power needed to use your site, affects how easily users find content and complete tasks.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

To improve learner comprehension and engagement, educators should:
1. Implement strategies to support intrinsic cognitive load such as adding glossaries.
2. Minimise extraneous cognitive load thorough clear consistent design,

See on www.nngroup.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

How to create an accessible infographic | Access iQ

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

As social media continues to grow as a powerful medium for sharing information and ideas, the need for accessible infographics has become more critical.

 

An infographic is a visual representation of data that turns complex information into bite-sized pieces that can be read at a glance. Because it can make a large amount of information easier to digest, perhaps the most valuable function of an infographic is the ease with which it can be shared across different social media platforms.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Making information accessible and usable to all learners enables 

all learners to participate in learning on the same basis.

See on accessiq.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Exclusive Special Report on Blended Learning

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

This Education Week special report is the latest installment in an ongoing series about online education. These stories examine the opportunities and persistent questions that surround schools’ and districts’ implementation of blended learning, the widely used instructional approach that combines technology-based instruction with traditional, face-to-face lessons.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

For Blended learning to be successful educators need to really unpack the principles of TPACK and SAMR. It is the considered use of the tech for education purposes not the tech itself that is the driver.

See on e-news.edweek.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

IBM standardizing on EPUB to reduce digital barriers and increase mobile support

See on Scoop.iteBookED

SEATTLE, WA: International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) and IBM  today announced a collaboration to develop a white paper highlighting lessons learned from IBM’s recent decision to support EPUB as the company’s primary packaged portable document format.

 

EPUB is the widely adopted open standard format, for digital publications, developed by IDPF, based on HTML5 and other technologies from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), as well as technologies from IDPF. IDPF is a trade and standards association with over 300 members in over 45 countries.  Increased client demand for mobile solutions, accessibility through the cloud, and the transformational opportunities both pose for enterprise content are the key drivers for IBM’s move to the next-generation portable document format. By standardizing on EPUB, IBM is also extending its leadership in accessibility and delivering a richer user experience and engagement.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

ePUBs are the key to increasing accessibility and delivering a richer user experience and engagement. for education.  

See on globalaccessibilitynews.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

6 Of My All-Time Favorite Conversion Rate Optimization Case Studies

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Want to start conversion testing your website, but don’t know where to start? Here 6 conversion rate optimization case studies + actionable advice to help.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

How do you motivate online learners to actively engage and participate in activities? Conversion rate optimization offers some interesting research that can be readily contextualised to education.

See on blog.crazyegg.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Stages of Personalized Learning Environments (v3)

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

The Stages of Personalized Learning Environments (version 2) was updated from feedback and input from educators around the world.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

The brilliant work of McClaskey and Bray continues to evolve. A must read and implement for all educators committed to empowering novice learners  to become expert learners.

See on www.personalizelearning.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

What Is User Experience (UX) | Why Is User Experience Important

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Defines User Experience (UX), the disciplines included in User Experience and how your business can benefit from providing a good user experience

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Good User Experience (UX) is crucial if educators wish to engage  and sustain learners. Many educators only focus on one of the six UX disciplines (content) which does not lead to a great conversion rate for learning.

See on blog.crazyegg.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

PBL Teachers Need Time to Reflect, Too

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Student reflection is a key ingredient in project-based learning, and for good reason. As John Dewey reminded us nearly a century ago, “We do not learn from experience . . . we learn from reflecting

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Just because it is old doesn’t mean it isn’t valuable! John Dewey’s comment that "We do not learn from experience . . . we learn from reflecting on experience."applies to all learning.

See on www.edutopia.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Why access matters

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Watch our YouTube videos featuring some of Australia’s best-known disability advocates talking about the technologies and apps that have changed their lives as well as their daily frustrations of dealing with websites and apps that haven’t been made accessible to people with disability.

 

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Powerful stories about  enabling capacity of good design as well as the ongoing struggle for universal access. @ACCAN_AU #menabling #accessibility

See on accan.org.au

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Designing inclusive digital learning environments

Every school in Australia has legal obligations and responsibilities under Federal legislation such as the Disability standards for education (2005) to ensure that all learners with or without a disability are able to participate in learning on the same basis. To ensure that all learners are able to participate in learning on the same basis may involve the school taking reasonable steps to ensure that any adjustments required are made within a reasonable time. It is important to note that making these reasonable adjustments should not be confused with differentiating. What follows are strategies for Designing inclusive digital learning environments based upon increasing learner inclusion, engagement and comprehension through universal usability.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The secret structure of great talks

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

From the “I have a dream” speech to Steve Jobs’ iPhone launch, all great presentations have a common architecture. In this talk, Nancy Duarte draws lessons on how to make a powerful call-to-action.

(Filmed at TEDxEast.)

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

An extremely powerful presentation. Great learning has a powerful narrative and journey. Great learning involves the art of telling story of ideas.

See on www.ted.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Report: Kids Tend to Read Digital More Than Print

See on Scoop.iteBookED

The process of reading is undergoing a paradigm shift where kids are starting to read on smartphones and tablets more than physical print. The quintessential

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

The data confirms our annecdotal experience. The data also only gives a snapshot of what was rather than what is. The paradigm shift is well and truly occurring. The question is how are we responding to the shift?

See on goodereader.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

What Is Web 3.0 And How Will It Change Education? – Edudemic

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

We’ll reach a new state of web skills when we reinvent technology tools to better enhance our personal learning. We’ll be at 3.0 when schools are everywhere and not viewed as daycare.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Don’t sweat the number (3.0). Focus on the fact that it is a cultural shift enabled by technological change. How do you want to reimagine what learning will be.

See on www.edudemic.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Flipping the Library: Tips from Three Pros | The Digital Shift 2013 – The Digital Shift

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Three experts shared tech tips and tools during “Flipped School Libraries,” a rapid-fire, dynamic session during The Digital Shift: Reinventing Libraries (#TDS13) webcast.

 

 

Through the use of innovative technologies and online resources, school libraries can now be available tostudents wherever—and whenever—they need them. “Flipped” or blended learning offers students thepower of personalized instruction, through a mix of virtual and face-to-face interactions, at a student’s own pace. Embracing this concept is a must for student engagement and the future of the profession, say school librarians Joyce Valenza, Brenda Boyer, and Michelle Luhtala.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

considered reimagining of purpose & processe in response to technological & cultural change.

See on www.thedigitalshift.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Personalize Learning: 10 Trends for Personalized Learning in 2014

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

Bray and McClaskey provide the Top 10 Trends for Personalized Learning in 2014

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Another well written piece Barbara! The cornerstone is the definitely changing the language TO Learner AWAY from Student. This simple but powerful change is the first step in reframing the whole paradigm. I believe that to really move forward we must also change the language for Teacher as well as it will help to reframe and redefine our role. So what is the term we should use…..mentor, coach, leading learner?

See on www.personalizelearning.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Podcasting Guide | PoducateMe

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

Provides instruction for and discussion of how to podcast in education and beyond. Features a comprehensive guide to podcasting that’s free to read in its entirety online. Also includes podcast news, kits, and hardware and software recommendations.

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Podcasting and screencasting are a key component of rebooting the classroom to flip the learning paradigm. This is a very comprehensive resource!

See on poducateme.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Establishing A Growth Mindset As A Teacher: 9 Affirming Statements – TeachThought

See on Scoop.itBrain Bytes

“The ability to change is among the least-appreciated professional characteristics of a teacher.

 

This is especially true as education systems react to both external pressure, and internal instinct to change into something closer to truly progressive learning environments.”

 

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

 To support other learners to develop a growth minset we must first grow our own.

See on www.teachthought.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Disabililty

See on Scoop.itpersonalised learning

I had to come up with a 30 sec video on anything I wanted for my university course. This is what I came up with. Follow me on twitter @ https://twitter.com/i...

Greg Alchin‘s insight:

Christopher Hills’ video has a very powerful message. What makes it more so is when you realise that Chris produced the video via switch access! Way to go @iAmMaccing!

See on www.youtube.com

Print Friendly, PDF & Email